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Table 4 Oxygen saturation (SpO2) and clinical outcomes of participants with at least one SpO2 < 92 % at any study visit among young infants undergoing routine pulse oximetry at primary care clinics in Karachi, Pakistan

From: Utility and feasibility of integrating pulse oximetry into the routine assessment of young infants at primary care clinics in Karachi, Pakistan: a cross-sectional study

ID Age (days)1 SpO2 attempt #1 (%)a SpO2 Attempt #2 (%)a IMCI signsa,b Physician diagnosisa # of study visitsc SpO2 range (%)c Vital status at 59 days of age
1 3 72 - RR, NM Acute respiratory infection 1 N/A Alive
2 5 73 99 RR, NM Sepsis 5 91 – 99 Alive
3 37 87 88 RR Acute respiratory infection, congenital heart disease 5 82 – 93 Alive
4 7 84 91 None No acute illness 1 N/A Deceased
5 3 84 94 None Hyperbilirubinemia 3 97 – 99 Alive
6 1 86 - RR Acute respiratory infection 10 93 – 100 Alive
7 0 90 - None No acute illness 1 N/A Alive
8 1 91 - FVR, RR, LCI, PF Sepsis 5 94 – 100 Alive
9 14 91 - RR, LCI Sepsis 4 97 Alive
10 2 91 - None No acute illness 2 97 Lost to follow Up
  1. aRefers to first clinic visit at which hypoxemia (SpO2 < 92 %) was detected for each infant
  2. bIntegrated management of childhood illness (IMCI) algorithm signs of very severe disease in a young infant, as detected by the study worker: RR = Respiratory rate ≥ 60; NM = No movement or movement only on stimulation; FVR = Fever; LCI = Severe lower chest wall in-drawing; PF = History of poor feeding
  3. cRefers to other clinic visits by the same infant during first 2 months of life