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Table 5 Association of socio-demographic factors to nutritional problems

From: Nutritional status of school children living in Northern part of Sri Lanka

Socio-economic factors Stunting Wasting Overweight and obesity
Yes (%) No (%) OR (95%CI)
P Value
Yes (%) No (%) OR (95%CI)
P Value
Yes (%) No (%) OR (95%CI)
P Value
Education level of the mother    7.79    3.23    2.87
 Low 62 (54) 117 (13) (5.15–11.8) 79 (26) 70 (10) (2.26–4.62) 51 (29) 104 (12) (1.95–4.33)
 Good 53 (46) 780 (87) < 0.001 223 (74) 640 (90) < 0.001 125 (71) 732 (88) < 0.0001
Family Income    61.4    22.71    16.07
 Low 103 (89) 110 (12) (32.69–115-3) 245 (81) 113 (16) (15.97–32.27) 124 (70) 108 (13) (10.97–23.54)
 Adequate 12 (11) 787 (88) < 0.0001 57 (19) 597 (84) < 0.001 52 (30) 728 (87) < 0.0001
Family Size    0.72    0.38    0.18
 < 5 105 (91) 839 (94) (0.36–1.4) 194 (64) 584 (82) (0.28–0.52) 102 (58) 738 (88) (0.12–0.26)
 > 5 10 (9) 58 (6) = 0.3 108 (36) 126 (18) < 0.0001 74 (42) 98 (12) < 0.0001
Residential Area    2.4    0.87    0.84
 Rural 75 (65) 429 (48) (1.36–3.06) 109 (36) 290 (41) (0.62–1.08) 59 (34) 313 (37) (0.59–1.18)
 Urban 40 (35) 468 (52) = 0.0005 193 (64) 420 (59) = 0.15 117 (66) 523 (63) = 0.3
  1. aLow was no education, incomplete and complete primary. Adequate was incomplete secondary, secondary and higher degree
  2. bHousehold equivalent income (HEI): low less than LKR 15,000, adequate more than LKR 15,000