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Table 3 Understanding of antibiotics among respondent’s gender, age, living in Makkah and single parent status

From: Parents’ self-directed practices towards the use of antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections in Makkah, Saudi Arabia

Statement Very much
N (%)
Plenty
N (%)
Not much
N (%)
A little
N (%)
Not at all
N (%)
Gender
OR (95% CI)
Age
OR (95% CI)
Live in Makkah
OR (95% CI)
Single Parent
OR (95% CI)
How much do you think that you are informed about judicious antibiotic use? 27
(4.7)
107
(18.8)
280
(49.1)
94
(16.5)
36
(6.3)
− 0.013
(− 0.0405–0.299)
− 0.98*
(− 0.315- -0.23)
− 0.035
(− 0.447–0.182)
0.086*
(0.016–0.793)
How many antibiotics do you think your child receives compared to other children? 11
(1.9)
67
(11.8)
210
(36.8)
186
(32.6)
61
(10.7)
0.05
(− 0.154–0.603)
− 0.053
(− 0.258–0.058)
− 0.025
(− 0.441–0.236)
0.113*
(0.115–0.991)
How much do you pay attention to the possible side-effects of antibiotics? 110
(19.3)
164
(28.8)
129
(22.6)
88
(15.4)
51
(8.9)
0.034
(− 0.256–0.605)
− 0.029
(− 0.243–0.118)
− 0.016
(− 0.464–0.315)
0.098*
(0.090–1.052)
Do you agree that you will be dissatisfied if your pediatrician does not prescribe an antibiotic for your child’s Upper Respiratory Tract Infection? 52
(9.1)
98
(17.2)
183
(32.1)
139
(24.4)
68
(11.9)
0.011
(− 0.365–0.474)
− 0.015
(− 0.207–0.145)
− 0.026
(− 0.500–0.259)
0.078
(− 0.028–0.909)
  1. Linear logistic regression, * = significant (p < 0.05); gender (ref male); age (20–30 years); live in Makkah (ref yes); Single parent (ref yes)