Skip to main content

Advertisement

Table 2 Parents’ choice for most effective strategy to inform parents about passive smoking in children and how to prevent it

From: Recruiting families for an intervention study to prevent second-hand smoke exposure in children

Strategy Smoking in the presence of the child Total (n = 1,540) OR (95% CI)a
  YES-n = 141 (9) NO-n = 1,399 (91)   
An internet program (n (%)) 45 (32) 131 (9) 176 (11) 2.0 (1.2–3.4)#
A program via telephone contacts (n (%)) 3 (2) 11 (1) 14 (1) 1.6 (0.4–6.1)
A program consisting of motivational interviewing with a trained coach at home (n (%)) 25 (18) 655 (47) 680 (44) 0.2 (0.1–0.4)#
A group program for parents at a central location in a neighbourhood (n (%)) 13 (9) 161 (12) 174 (11) 0.5 (0.2–0.9)#
A combined program consisting of contacts by phone and motivational interviewing at home (n (%)) 29 (29) 290 (21) 319 (21) 0.6 (0.3–1.0)
Other (n (%))
 - Do not know (60 (34%))
 - TV documentaries and confrontational tv-advertisements (29 (16%))
 - Stop active smoking (21 (12%))
 - Smoking ban / take tobacco products of the market (18 (10%))
 - Education about smoking at schools (12 (7%))
 - Direct confrontation during e.g. doctor visits (11 (6%))
 - Combination of all programs (9 (5%))
 - Increase taxes and prices of tobacco products (5 (3%))
 - Make SHS exposure in children punishable by law (5 (3%))
 - Increase health insurance of smokers (3 (2%))
 - Tailored to personal needs and intervention strategy (2 (1%))
 - Free smoking-cessation programs or therapy (1 (1%))
 - Nothing will help (1 (1%))
26 (19) 151 (11) 177 (12) reference
  1. a OR = Odds Ratio, 95%CI = 95% Confidence Interval
  2. #p < 0.05