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Table 3 The relation between the duration of breastfeeding and the risks of current asthma, persistent wheezing, cough, and phlegm at the end of the follow-up period (N = 1933).

From: Breastfeeding and childhood asthma: a six-year population-based cohort study

Duration of breastfeeding Current asthma Persistent wheezing Persistent cough Persistent phlegm
  Adjusted OR* 95% CI Adjusted OR* 95% CI Adjusted OR* 95% CI Adjusted OR* 95% CI
0–3 months 1.44 0.78, 2.66 1.64 0.77, 3.52 1.72 0.94, 3.15 2.38 1.20, 4.70
4–6 months 1.00 (reference) 1.38 0.64, 2.97 1.35 0.73, 2.50 1.90 0.95, 3.79
7–9 months 1.16 0.65, 2.08 1.00 (reference) 1.00 (reference) 1.00 (reference)
9–12 months 1.72 0.97, 2.08 1.15 0.53, 2.50 1.21 0.65, 2.25 1.87 0.95, 3.71
> 12 months 1.60 0.83, 2.08 2.26 1.07, 4.79 1.63 0.84, 3.16 2.88 1.42, 5.84
Change in breastfeeding         
From optimal to shorter per month 1.10 0.92, 1.32 1.12 0.99, 1.19 1.08 0.98, 1.19 1.11 1.00, 1.24
From optimal to longer per month 1.03 1.00, 1.05 1.05 1.03, 1.08 1.04 1.02, 1.06 1.04 1.01, 1.06
  1. * Adjusted in logistic regression analysis for age, gender, parent's highest education, single parent or guardian, exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), smoking during pregnancy, parental atopy, and parental asthma, presence of hairy or feathery pets at home or type of day care during the past year
  2. Optimal was 7 months for asthma and 9 months for chronic respiratory symptoms
  3. Optimal 7 months
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