Skip to main content

Advertisement

Springer Nature is making SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 research free. View research | View latest news | Sign up for updates

Figure 3 | BMC Pediatrics

Figure 3

From: Predictors of exclusive breastfeeding: observations from the Alberta pregnancy outcomes and nutrition (APrON) study

Figure 3

Detailed breakdown of infant feeding categories during 3 and 6 months postpartum in a subsample of participants from the first phase of Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON) study 1,2 . (legend) 1Categories were defined based on the infant feeding guidelines of the World Health Organization. 2 Non-breastfeeding: requires that infants receive no breast milk (directly, expressed, or from a wet nurse) and could be fed any solid/semi-solid foods or liquids including non-human milk. Complementary feeding/replacement feeding: requires that infants receive breast milk (directly, expressed, or from a wet nurse) and solid/semi-solid foods, food-based liquids, or non-human milk. Predominant breastfeeding: requires that infants receive breast milk (directly, expressed, or from a wet nurse) as the main source of nourishment and allows feeding of certain liquids (water, water-based drinks, and fruit juice), ritual drinks, ORS, drops, and syrups (vitamins, minerals, medicines). Infants in this category are not allowed to receive anything else especially non-human milk and food-based fluids. Exclusive breastfeeding: requires that infants receive breast milk (directly, expressed, or from a wet nurse) and only allows intake of drops and syrups (vitamins, minerals, medicines). Infants in this group are not allowed to receive anything else.

Back to article page