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Figure 2 | BMC Pediatrics

Figure 2

From: Predictors of exclusive breastfeeding: observations from the Alberta pregnancy outcomes and nutrition (APrON) study

Figure 2

Infant feeding patterns and transitions between 3 months (n = 402) and 6 months (n = 300) postpartum in a subsample of participants from the first phase of Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON) study 1,2 . (legend) 1Categories were defined based on the infant feeding guidelines of the World Health Organization2. Non-breastfeeding: infants have received no breast milk (directly, expressed, or from a wet nurse) and could be fed any solid/semi-solid foods or liquids including non-human milk. Complementary feeding/replacement feeding: infants have received breast milk (directly, expressed, or from wet nurse) and solid/semi-solid foods, food-based liquids, or non-human milk. Predominant breastfeeding: infants have received breast milk (directly, expressed, or from a wet nurse) as the main source of nourishment, and feeding of certain liquids (water, water-based drinks, and fruit juice), ritual fluids, ORS, drops, and syrups (vitamins, minerals, and medicines) were allowed. Infants in this category have not received anything else especially non-human milk and food-based liquids. Exclusive breastfeeding: infants have received breast milk (directly, expressed, or from a wet nurse) and only ritual fluids, ORS, drops, and syrups (vitamins, minerals, and medicines) were allowed. Infants in this group were not allowed to receive anything else.

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